Courtly intrigue is a major staple both of Korean historical and fantasy narratives, and of popular South Korean historical TV series. This book will help GMs and players to learn more about the court culture of Joseon.

Although it’s not the easiest book to buy these days, The Dutch Come to Korea is a great resource for anyone considering the idea of using a Korean-inspired fantasy setting like Jeosung as part of a wider world setting, or as a setting in which non-native characters could find themselves and undertake adventures.

The tales are a mix of ghost tales, monster stories, and other weird tales, which fell broadly into the category of the yadam or what is called in modern literary circles in English: the “weird tale.” Ghosts turn up quite a bit, but so do figures like Jeon Woochi, the famed wizard mentioned in the first installment of this series, and occasional weird monsters and creatures of other kids.

As the masterful translator Minsoo Kang explains, this novel has had a profound effect on Korean culture and its sensibilities regarding heroism. (In fact, the book is so celebrated that when a fake name is needed for a government form or fake credit card, people usually just use his name.)